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Blog & PODCASTs

Ep:135 The Art of Community Building With the World’s Largest Online Cryptocurrency Community’s Founder
Ep:137 Why Everything on Your Path is For You with Trevor Hall
When To Walk Away From Your Job: 5 Tips From Olympian Kaylin Richardson
25 Marketing Influencers To Watch In 2017
Millennials, This Is What Your Quarter-Life Crisis Is Telling You
How To Create Viral Content: 5 Tips From Mega-Influencer Julius Dein
What Digital Nomads Know That You Don’t (Yet)
One Trait Top Millennial Performers Have In Common
5 Ways Visualization Will Help You Figure Out Your Next Career Move
7 Ways To Know If You’re On The Right Career Path
3 Skills Every Entrepreneur Needs to Advance Their Career in 2017
Millennials, Here’s Why Your Friends Make The Best Business Partners
Millennials, Here’s Why You’re Dissatisfied At Work
How Millennials Are Reshaping What’s Important In Corporate America

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Jules Schoeder

When To Walk Away From Your Job: 5 Tips From Olympian Kaylin Richardson

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, over 2 million people are quitting their jobs each month, and that number is only growing.

On average millennials will change jobs at least 4 times by the time they are 32, nearly twice as much as the previous generation. Knowing when it’s time to quit is crucial to long-term success.

Seth Godin, author of the best-selling book “The Dip,” says “The time to look for a new job is when you don’t need one. The time to switch jobs is before it feels comfortable.”

So how do you know when it is time to make the next move?

Just ask two-time Olympic skier Kaylin Richardson. At the peak of her career, after competing in her second Olympic games she decided to quit ski racing at the age of 25.

Richardson shares her experience on this week’s episode of Unconventional Life, “Recognizing When it’s Time to Quit Your Job and Make Your Next Move.”

Richardson had spent the past 16 years of her life racing — traveling around the world year-round to practice on the very best terrain, bypassing going to college, competing in her first Olympic games and slowly collecting victories to qualify for her second Olympic event.